TEACHING UNITS | TIMing & Unit SummaryS

The Seymore Says “Don’t Be A Bird Brain” is divided into 3 teaching units. Each unit is broken into subsections for grade level grouping K-2 | 3&4 | 5&6.

Schedule of Activities & Time Estimates

The following schedule of activities gives an estimated timeframe needed to complete the program. These time estimates are derived from beta test data and actual times and WILL vary depending on grade level, class size and/or material usage.

UNITS

Activity

Time p/day

Sessions

Max Duration

Grades K-2

Grades 3-4

Grades 5-6

1A | Cap Build, Design, Label

Art

45m

5

225M

OPTIONAL

1B | Brain Cap Color & Label

Art

45m

2

90M

OPTIONAL

1C | Brain Cap Label

Science

45m

1

45m

X

X

X

2A | Brain Anatomy | Parts

Science

45m

1

45m

X

X

X

2B | Brain Anatomy | Function

Science

45m

2

90m

X

X

X

3 | “Feeling the Pain” | Book

Reading

45m

1

45M

X

X

X

4A | Helpful & Good Medicines

Health

45m

2

90m

X

X

X

4B | Legal | Bad Substances

Health

45m

1

45m

X

X

X

4C | Illegal | Dangerous

Health

45m

2

90m

 

X

X

4D | Illegal | Dangerous

Health

45m

2

90m

 

 

X

MINUMUM CLASS TIME INVESTMENT (hrs.)

7hrs

8hrs

9hrs

Learning Outcomes

The Seymore Says “Don’t Be a Brid Brain!” educational program is a science-based program focused on substance awareness, designed by educators for students.

Program Design and Materials

The program follows an efficacy-based model of design and continuous measurement and improvement.  Program materials remain relevant to current conditions and ongoing feedback from schools/educators and students are reviewed to allow for versioning and updates to the program.

All lesson plans and program materials are designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn through guided and practical exercises, deepening their understanding and retention of the subject matter. .

Teaching Unit 1 | Building My Brain

Image result for students painting a brain cap

This unit centers on a modeling project where students visualize and reflect as they construct brain models in this activity. Within the scientific community,  models are an important mechanism for advancing scientific understanding. Science students who become actively involved in using models in their learning have shown to gain a deeper understanding of the concepts and processes about which they are learning.

Students learn what a model is by comparing a model of the brain to their own brain. They practice asking themselves, "How this is model like the thing it represents, and how is it different?" 

This format of questioning can be used when using any model in science and can be used to check students' understanding and misconceptions.

Learning goals and objectives: 

  • Students will identify ways that a model and its subject are alike and some ways that they are different

  • Students will learn to ask, "How is this brain model like my own brain and how it is different?"

  • As students learn more about a topic in science, their comparisons of model and object will reflect their knowledge

Visual Art Unit | program elements include:

  • Discussion - The lesson outcomes/objectives are the blueprint of building and designing the brain model. The discussion portion of the lesson allows students to express their opinion about what they have built.  Teacher guides the discussion, supported by the worksheets

  • Post-Unit Assessment – Student activity worksheets queries student based on the labeling of the brain parts and associated functions

Teaching Unit 2 | My Brain

Using their individual brain models, students will learn the locations of the lobes, cortical areas, and structures in the brain as well as the specific areas and structures.

Learning goals and objectives:

·        Identify brain parts

·        Identify corresponding brain functions

·        Observe how structure and function are related in the brain

Science Unit | program elements include:                                              

  • Discussion - The discussion portion of the lesson allows students to express their opinion about what they have learned.  Teacher guides the discussion, supported by the worksheets

  • Program Assessments – Student activity worksheets capture student’s understanding of brain anatomy.  All worksheets model the lesson outcomes/objectives, using terminology from the lesson to help with the student’s retention and acquisition of the information

LESSON PLANS | Teaching Unit 3 | “Feeling the Pain”

The program begins with a story about medicine and pain. Seymore joins, Logan, and the Critters as they encounter real life situations involving the use of medicines.  The storyline centers on good, bad, and dangerous substances and how misuse can affect anyone’s health … including a Critter.

Learning goals and objectives:

§  The student will use pre-reading strategies to predict what the story is about. The student will explain if his/her prediction was confirmed or not at the end of class

  • After completing the lesson, the student will be able to make generalizations and draw conclusions about medicine use

  • After reading the story, the student will be able to answer questions about the proper use of medicines

Language Arts | program elements include:

  • “Feeling the Pain” | The Comic Book is available in two versions, the black & white coloring version (K-2 grade levels), and a full color Comic Book version (3-6 grade levels).

  • Pre-Unit Assessment – Student activity worksheets capture student’s perception and opinion of the story. All worksheet statements model the lesson outcomes/objectives, using terminology from the storybook to help with the student’s retention and acquisition of the information.

  • Discussion - The lesson outcomes/objectives are the blueprint of the Comic Book, which finds students talking to students in real, everyday terms. The discussion portion of the lesson allows students to express their opinion about what they read.  Teacher guides the discussion, supported by the worksheet statements and lesson PowerPoint.

  • Post-Unit Assessment – Student activity worksheets queries student to re-assess the same statements after they have benefited from the discussion.

 Teaching Unit 4 | Effects of Drugs on my Brain

Once the students have identified, labeled, and learned the parts and functions, in Unit Four they will learn about good, bad, and dangerous medicines and drugs and how those substances, if used incorrectly, can be harmful to their brain.

Learning goals and objectives:

·        Learn the concept of Good, Bad, & Dangerous Medicines and Drugs

·        Identify helpful and good medicines

·        Identify harmful substances and drugs

·        Identify harmful effects of each substance on specific parts of the brain and corresponding function

Health & Science Unit | program elements include:

  • Discussion - The discussion portion of the lesson allows students to express their opinion about how they view drugs found in their community and how they may affect family and friends.  Teacher guides the discussion, supported by the worksheets

  • Program Assessments – Student activity worksheets capture student’s understanding of the brain and the effects of drugs on brain functions.  All worksheets model the lesson outcomes/objectives, using terminology from the lesson to help with the student’s retention and acquisition of the information

Post-Program Support & Programs

  • Take-home program brochures and program website containing information and resources are available supporting student, parents, and school after the programs. Evidence-Based Results – The completed worksheets and the survey data helps The Seymore D’ Fair Foundation track and measure the effectiveness of the lesson plan and education materials and improve upon the program.

  • Fundraising – Participating schools may choose from several fundraising programs. These “content driven” fundraising efforts promote the substance awareness message and effect retention while raising critical dollars for individual schools.